Tech Tip Tuesday: End of Year Schoology Tips

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Now’s the time to begin taking a moment to make sure you have all of your Schoology materials/courses in order for the end of the year. Here are a few tips to consider to help make a smooth transition through the summer and into next year.

  1. Create and use folders: The method is simple- create a folder for every unit you teach, then within that folder consider using other folders to organize daily/weekly lesson, types of assignments, or self-paced activities. This is easier for students to manage, and makes it easier for you to save everything to your personal resources (to be discussed next). Pro Tip! Go to your personal resources (click resources –> personal –> then ADD new folder) Title the folder the name of your courses. This will help with step #2.
  2. Save all of your material/content to your resources: This is imperative! If you followed tip #1, this step becomes a cinch. Go into each of your courses, then next to the folder/material you want to save, click on the little gear icon to the right of it, then select SAVE TO RESOURCES from the drop-down menu. A pop-up window will appear. You can select a collection from the drop-down at the top (I recommend leaving this with HOME) and then underneath designate a folder to organize it to (select the course folder you just created if you followed the pro tip above). Do this with everything. This saves everything in case your courses get deleted. PLUS- next year you can just go to your personal resources, select the course folder, then copy entire folders/individual assignments over to your new courses! Even quiz questions stay.
  3. Check out this document/Schoology Help with more tips to end the year right!
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Tech Tip Tuesday: Having Issues Using Schoology with Safari or Firefox?

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Recently, a handful of teachers have come to me about issues with Schoology when using Safari or Firefox. One of them being embedded content (like a Google Doc or Slide presentation) not loading properly or just getting empty content. Here is an example of one of the Schoology PD modules:

Screen Shot 2018-05-15 at 8.16.09 AM

The image above shows an error in Schoology with an embedded Google Doc that is not loading properly. When you get this you can click the little box and arrow in the upper right-hand corner of the screen and it will open a new tab to the Google Doc. However, this shouldn’t have to be done.

The way around this is quite simple. Simply make sure you re logged into your Google account! To do this, just go to gmail.com –> login with your school account. Then reload the page or navigate to the Schoology page you are trying to access. Once you do that, this is what it will look like:

Screen Shot 2018-05-15 at 8.21.08 AM

Notice the embedded Google Doc that can you interact with right within Schoology. Simple and effective. So if you or your students ever have this issue, just make sure they are logged into their school Google account.

Hope this helps!

Tech Tip Tuesday: Utilize Turnitin With Schoology

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If you haven’t already taken advantage of the Turnitin app within Schoology, here is a quick “how-to” to get started:

What is it? 

A plagiarism detection tool to ensure academic integrity. It will give you an overall summary of originality score as well as percentages of what was pulled/taken from what site.

To get started, go create an assignment as you normally would by selecting “add materials”. From here select “add file/link/external tool” –> “external tool”.

In the window that opens, select Turnitin from the “tool provider” drop-down menu. Give the assignment a name/title, then check the grading box to open the submenu. From here you can set the point value, due date, and category. Once complete, scroll down and select “submit”.

Once the assignment is created, find it within the class stream and click on the title. The Turnitin LTI app will open. Click “settings” to modify anything on the Turnitin side. Make sure the “start date” and “due date” match what you set on the Schoology end. You can also establish a feedback release date if you would like. Next, make sure you enter your instructions. These are the instructions your students will see when they access this assignment.

A few extras . . . open the “optional settings” to be able to modify or allow for things such as late submissions, enable grammar checker, exclude resources, or allow students to view the similarity report. Once you are finished, click “submit” at the bottom. The Turnitin assignment will save. You can now go back to your main course screen and everything will be set for your students to begin submitting work. Make sure your assignment is “active” and allowing submissions. Once students complete their submissions, you’ll be able to click on the assignment to open all student submissions and view the similarity reports for each.

Hope this helps!

Tech Tip Tuesday: The Best Classroom Screen


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Here is a fun all-purpose tool that was recently shared with me that I wanted to forward out to everyone. It does a little bit of everything. ClassroomScreen is a website that takes your home screen and turns it into an educator’s “hub”. Here’s how it works:

First you load up classroomscreen.com Then you project this page/tool in your classroom. And finally, you then take advantage of a plethora of tools/widgets at your disposal like a: language tool, QR code generator, a drawing tool, a timer, a stoplight (yes), a nise meter, a random name generator, etc. You can manipulate the screen to look the way you want, but you cannot save it (bummer). However, it only takes seconds to set it up the way you like.

Hoe this helps!

Tech Tip Tuesday: Insert Your Learning into Any Website

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Have you heard of Insert Learning? Insert Learning is a simple yet effective program that can turn any website into an interactive lesson. Here’s how it works: first you go to Insert Learning’s website or the Chrome Webstore and download the Chrome extension.

Next, go to any website, say, for example, cnn.com–> and select an article. Once on the webpage, click on the insert learning Chrome Extension and the toolbar will appear on the left side of the screen. From here you can: insert a question, highlight text, insert a discussion, add a sticky note, embed a video, embed various other tools such as Padlet boards, Thinglinks, Quizlets, NPR radio broadcasts and so on. Once complete, you can assign this activity/lesson to your class (which you do at the beginning by creating a class in Insert Learning). Even cooler? You can copy the url to this lesson just by copying it and adding  #insertlearning to the end of the url, then pasting this code/inserting it into Schoology. If you are a Google Classroom user, you can just select Google Classroom from the Insert Learning toolbar, and assign it there.

This is a simple and effective way to turn any passive article or website into something interactive and more engaging!

Tech Tip Tuesday: Search Gmail Like a Pro

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Gmail includes a pretty simple feature that allows you to search for specific emails using some clever operators. You can type in that search bar, add in some words, and hope to locate the specific email you are looking for. But sometimes, you get back way too many or you can’t locate what it is you seek. I put together a Gmail Crib Sheet that covers the Gmail Operators and how to use them. You can access the document here!

Hope this helps!

 

Tech Tip Tuesday: Using QR Codes in the Classroom

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Have you tried incorporating QR codes into your classroom? QR (quick response) codes are super easy to create and are a fun way for students to get to use their cellphones in the classroom. To create QR codes there are a variety of websites/tools out there to do it.

To create QR codes:

To scan QR codes:

  • Google Goggles (for Android)
  • With ios 11, you can use your iPhone or iPad’s camera. No need for an app. ios 11 will automatically scan the QR code and a link will appear. Click the link to go to the page.
  • Snapchat. Seriously. With Snapchat open, point the camera at the code and hold your finger over the image to read it.

So What if . . .

  • Students created QR codes on submitted projects to enhance the interactivity.
  • You used QR codes to generate a Google Form for peer-to-peer feedback, reviews, or for peer-editing with essays.
  • You used QR to create a digital scavenger hunt.
  • You used QR codes with a BreakOutEdu (I have this kit!)
  • Incorporating QR with homework to help extend the learning with extra resources.