Tech Tip Tuesday: Using Google Jamboard as a Digital Whiteboard

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If you haven’t played around with the Google Jamboard, you are missing out. Not only is it a physical board found in the model classrooms, but it is also a free digital whiteboard that you can access from your Google apps in your own classroom at any time WITHOUT the need for the physical board! Even cooler? Students can use their personal devices (cellphones if they download the app) and their Macbook Airs to collaborate with you on it.

What can you do with it:

  • Brainstorm notes or create a classroom mind-map of something they are studying with you as the COO (Chief Operations Officer) at the helm, guiding it all.
  • Using phones, you can drop in files from individual Google Drive accounts into the “jam”.
  • Have groups collaborate and share individual slides/pages within the “jam”.
  • Map out essays, historical battles, drop in images/maps/emojis, etc.

To access the Jamboard app, simply open your Google Rubik’s cube (located in top right corner of your Google search window) –> click it and find the Jamboard app (“J” logo, you may need to scroll down the list a bit to find it) –> click to open –> Then just click the orange “+” sign in the bottom right corner to start a new “jam” –> then share it as you would any Google file.

Need some PD hours and want to learn more about the Jamboard app/physical board? Check out this blended learning style PD module here!

Hope this helps!

Tech Tip Tuesday: Make Your Own Google Substitutions

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Here is another quick Google tip! You can make your own substitutions, which will help a lot during writing. Google docs make a list of auto substitutions, but you can also customize it as you like. To do this: Go to Tools –> Preference –> make a change in your requirement. You’ll notice a list with two columns, Replace and With. The text in Replace is what you type and the text/symbols in With is what will be substituted when the corresponding Replace strand is entered. When you are done click OK.

You can also click to turn off all automatic substitutions by unchecking the Automatic substitutions box, or you can turn off specific substitutions individually by unchecking the box next to that entry.

Hope this helps!

Tech Tip Tuesday: Using the Tool Tip Feature in Schoology

tech-tip-tuesday

There are so many features in Schoology that most of us do not even realize are available. Many of these fly under the radar and we never get a chance to see what they are and how to best utilize them in the classroom. One such feature is the “Tooltip”.

To access the “tooltip”, create a material/assignment as you normally would, then in editing mode –> highlight a word or phrase –> click the “insert content” button –> select “tooltip” –> type what you want your note or information to be –> click the green checkmark –> then save at bottom. Once you are out of the editing mode, the word or phrase you selected will show a light blue line underneath and if you hover over it, a question mark/bubble will appear with your note!

The “tooltip” feature is great if you want to add more information or a definition to your content to better help your students. You can even add a “tooltip” to an image by selecting the image and following the steps noted above. This is great for DI or to help struggling learners and/or ESL students.

Hope this helps!

Tech Tip Tuesday: Use Google Drawings to Make Interactive Flow Charts and Graphic Organizers

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There is something to be said of how useful graphic organizers are, so finding a way to utilize them in the digital classroom is a plus. If you haven’t played around with Google Drawings, it is Google’s version to Microsoft Paint. A simple program that lets you do a number of creative things.

All you have to do is open Google Drawings, and start mapping out what you want the graphic organizer or flow chart to look like. Students can even create their own for an assignment. Check out this website link for a lot of information about making your own or for example templates you can use right away.

To create your own, simply open Google Drawings. Begin inserting shapes into your drawing. Use lines or arrows to connect parts together. Pro Tip: Utilize the gray area of the screen to hold objects This is great if you want students to move objects into the drawing. When you are all set with your creation, make sure you set the share settings to “anyone with the link can view”. Then, remind students that when they open it, they have to go to FILE –> Make a Copy so they can begin editing their own version and share back with you!

Hope this helps!